Club House

Main building at a golf course usually hosting a Pro Shop to check-in for Tee-Time, pay greens fees and cart fees and purchase merchandise such as balls, gloves, hats, shirts etc.  Some club houses will have a bar, restaurant, and locker rooms with a shower to change after your round.

Pro Shop

The Pro Shop is were you check-in for your Tee-Time, pay greens fees and cart fees and purchase merchandise such as balls, gloves, hats, shirts etc.  It is important you check-in at least 15 minutes before you tee-time to help the golf course run on schedule.  Folks showing up right at the tee time delay everyone else’s round.

Practice Putting Green

Golf Courses have a practice putting green outside the clubhouse for you to practice putting.  Practice Putting Greens are designed to be the same speed as the greens on the golf course so it’s important to show up 30 minutes early and practice putting to get a feel for the greens if “score” is important to you.  The speed of greens will vary between golf courses with some rolling faster and others roll slower than what you may be used to.

Driving Range

Golf Courses with driving ranges allow you to warm up your swing and ball striking before a round of golf.  It’s important to start your warm up hitting wedges or 9 irons to loosen up first and then gradually hit mid irons, hybrids and then the driver last.  Show up 45 minutes before your tee time and warm up.

Golf Course Design

Golf courses have either18 holes or 9 holes to play.  Each golf course is a set of unique hole designs made up of Par 3, Par 4, and Par 5 length golf holes that provide a variety of distances & challenges throughout a round of golf.  There are also Executive or Par 3 golf courses where all of the holes are shorter or Par 3 in length and perfect for practice or beginning golfers.

Score Card

The score card provides the yardage from each colored tee box for each hole and provides space to write the name of each golfer and their score for each hole. The score card lists the handicap rating, or difficulty, of each hole in order of difficulty.

Handicap Index

A Handicap Index is a calculation of your all of your 9 or 18 holes round scores and the difficulty rating of the golf courses you play.  After you play 10 rounds & enter your scores into the handicap computer you will have a handicap index # that allows you to play club & area golf tournaments..  A zero handicap is a scratch golfer that shoots even par.  A 40 handicap golfer is a beginner & shoots well into the 100’s.  Two golfers with handicaps can play a fair match against each other.  For example, a 10 handicap golfer will have to give a 20 handicap golfer 10 extra strokes to even out their abilities.

Par 4

A Par 4 is a hole designed for the golfer to reach the green in “Regulation” in 2 shots and then requiring 2 putts to make Par or a total of 4 stokes. This Hole Sign represents the Hole #1, Par 4 that plays 380 yards from the Blue tee markers, 365 yards from the white markers, and 340 yards from the Red tee markers.

Par 3

A Par 3 is a shorter length hole designed for the golfer to reach the green in “Regulation” in one shot and then assumes 2 putts to make Par or a total of 3 stokes.  This Hole Sign represents the Par 3 Hole #2 that plays 165 yards from the Blue tee markers, 155 yards from the white markers, and 145 yards from the Red tee markers.

Par 5

A Par 5 is a longer length hole designed for the golfer to reach the green in “Regulation” in three shots and then assumes 2 putts to make Par or a total of 5 stokes.  This Hole Sign represents the Hole #3, Par 5 that plays 485 yards from the Blue tee markers, 470 yards from the white markers, and 445 yards from the Red tee markers.

Par 

A Par is a score that matches the Par for the hole.  A score of par on a Par 3 would be 3 strokes.  A score of par on a Par 4 would be 4 strokes.  A score of par on a Par 5 would be 5.

Bogey

A Bogey is a score that is one stroke over the Par for the hole.  A score of bogey on a Par 3 would be 4 strokes.  A score of bogey on a Par 4 would be 5 strokes.  A score of bogey on a Par 5 would be 6.

Double Bogey

A Double Bogey is a score that is two strokes over the Par for the hole.  A score of double bogey on a Par 3 would be 5 strokes.  A score of double bogey on a Par 4 would be 6 strokes.  A score of double bogey on a Par 5 would be 7.

Triple Bogey, Quadruple Body, Etc

A Triple Bogey is a score that is 3 strokes over the Par for the hole.  A score of triple bogey on a Par 3 would be 6 strokes.  A score of triple bogey on a Par 4 would be 7 strokes.  A score of triple bogey on a Par 5 would be 8.  A Quadruple bogey would be 4 stokes over Par for that hole.  A quadruple bogey on a Pa 4 would be a score of 8 or affectionately called a “Snowman”.

Tee Box

The Tee Box or Teeing Ground is where you hit your first shot for that hole.  Different color tee markers are staggered on Tee Boxes providing distance options golfers can play the golf course.  Typically, Red tee markers are the most forward markering the shortest length course you can play. Gold, White, Blue and Black provide incrementally longer yardage golf course experiences you can play.  Golfers should select the Tee Box where they can reach most Par 4’s in 2 shots.

 

Tee Markers

Each Tee Box has colored Tee Markers placed in the ground for you to tee your ball between marking the starting point for that hole. Typically, Red tee markers are the most forward markers creating the shortest length golf course to play. Gold, White, Blue and Black (where the Pros play) each provide an incrementally longer yardage golf course for you to play.  Golfers should select the Tee Box where they can reach most Par 4’s in 2 shots.

The Green

The Green is the putting surface of each hole and includes the Hole which houses the Cup, Flag, and Flagstick.

Fringe

The fringe is fairway height grass that is closest and circles the entire green.  Golfers will either putt or chip the ball from the fringe.

Apron

Part of the fairway approach that runs up into the green or putting surface. It often looks like an apron from a distance.

Green-side Rough

Green-side Rough is the tallest grass closes the the green and increases the degree of difficulty when chipping or pitching if you are not accurate with your approach shot into the green.

Fairway

Used to mark the spot where you balls lies on the putting green so the other golfer can putt their ball and not hits yours if your ball sits in their way.  Can be any shape it just needs to be flat incase a ball does happen to roll over it.  It may be a luck coin or charm of your choice.

Rough

Rough is longer length grass designed to increase the difficulty of your next shot when you are not accurate.  How your ball sits in the rough will determine your shot. The more the ball sits down in longer the grass the greater the difficulty hitting the ball forward and in the air.  Often times, it is best to use a higher lofted club to get the most out of your ball performance.

Bunker / Sand Trap

A sand trap or bunker is considered a hazard designed to penalize the golfer for lack of accuracy.  A bunker shot requires a sand wedge & specific technique to execute the shot.  Etiquette requires all golfers to rake the sand smooth after use to allow those playing behind you a smooth surface.

Out of Bounds

A sand trap or bunker is considered a hazard designed to penalize the golfer for lack of accuracy.  A bunker shot requires a sand wedge & specific technique to execute the shot.  Etiquette requires all golfers to rake the sand smooth after use to allow those playing behind you a smooth surface.

Hazard – Red Stake

A sand trap or bunker is considered a hazard designed to penalize the golfer for lack of accuracy.  A bunker shot requires a sand wedge & specific technique to execute the shot.  Etiquette requires all golfers to rake the sand smooth after use to allow those playing behind you a smooth surface.

Lateral Hazard – Yellow Stake

A sand trap or bunker is considered a hazard designed to penalize the golfer for lack of accuracy.  A bunker shot requires a sand wedge & specific technique to execute the shot.  Etiquette requires all golfers to rake the sand smooth after use to allow those playing behind you a smooth surface.

Ball Mark & Repair

Landing a golf ball onto a green will scar and make a hole in the green called a Ball Mark.  Etiquette requires you to repair the ball mark and other ball marks you may see so the putting surface can heal and balls can roll smoothly.  Fixed ball marks take a week to heal.  Unfixed ball marks scar the green permanently.